The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

* The God of Small Things (1997) is the debut novel of Indian writer Arundhati Roy. 

* It is a story about the childhood experiences of fraternal twins whose lives are destroyed by the "Love Laws" that lay down "who should be loved, and how. And how much.

* The book is a description of how the small things in life affect people's behaviour and their lives. The book won the Booker Prize in 1997.

* The God of Small Things is Roy's first book and, as of 2013, is her only novel. Completed in 1996, the book took four years to write. 

* The potential of the story was first recognized by Pankaj Mishra, an editor with HarperCollins, who sent it to three British publishers. 

* Roy received half-a-million pounds in advances, and rights to the book were sold in 21 countries.

* While generally praised, the book did receive some criticism for its verbosity and controversial subject matter.

* Indian history and politics shape the plot and meaning of The God of Small Things in a variety of ways. Some of Roy's commentary is on the surface, with jokes and snippets of wisdom about political realities in India. However, the novel also examines the historical roots of these realities and develops profound insights into the ways in which human desperation and desire emerge from the confines of a firmly entrenched caste society.

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